OWNED AND PRODUCED BY   UNDER THE PATRONAGE OF   OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS

   
SUPPORTED BY        
         

 

UFI APPROVED EVENT



 

STRATEGIC PARTNER (USA)

SPONSORS

KNOWLEDGE PARTNER
 
 
STRATEGIC PARTNER
 



CONSULTING PARTNER

PRINCIPAL MEDIA PARTNER - ITALY


 

MEDIA PARTNERS
 
       
1
     

LATEST FROM PEI

The World Nuclear Association has released a new report, which shows the nuclear power sector to be in a positive state.

The owner of the 417 MW Cuno Herdecke H6 gas-fired power plant have reversed a decision to mothball the facility.

The UK will remain committed to action against climate change despite its vote to leave the European Union, energy secretary Amber Rudd said today.

Wärtsilä is to supply a 161 MW combined-cycle power plant to Yamama Cement Company in Saudi Arabia.

POWER ENGINEERING Intl. Newscast

REW.COM Latest news

Tesla Motors Inc.’s bid to buy the biggest U.S. rooftop solar installer has little to do with selling cars. Rather, it’s about solving two of the biggest problems standing in the way of the next solar boom. And perhaps a good deal more.

When Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk came out last week with his $2.86 billion plan to acquire SolarCity Inc., it was almost universally derided as a risky financial move that threatens to derail the electric car maker at its most critical moment.

That’s undoubtedly true. But in the dozens of analyst notes and news stories that picked apart the deal, there’s been little attention paid to what we’ll call “Tesla Solar” and how it could transform the power sector. It’s actually a really big idea.

Solar Problem No. 1: It’s too complicated

Consider the average homeowner who might be vaguely interested in adding rooftop solar. Where does the process start?

Hydroelectric power developer Gilkes Energy has begun construction on a trio of small hydro projects, all of which are to be located on the Attadale Estate near Loch Carron, Scotland.

Trouble may be brewing in China’s renewable energy industry if idled wind farms are anything to go by.

The nation’s clean-energy investment binge has made it the world leader in wind, accounting for about one in every three turbines currently installed, according to the Global Wind Energy Council. In turn, Xinjiang Goldwind Science & Technology Co., which makes the machines, has pushed past its western rivals such as Vestas Wind Systems A/S and General Electric Co.

Yet even with double the wind capacity, China still produces less electricity from turbines when compared with the U.S. That’s because it’s installing lower-quality machines using less reliable breezes and doing so more quickly than the distribution grid can take in the flows.

When I first got into solar, Florida seemed to be a natural market. After all, it’s the Sunshine State. In spite of the sun, there is one big problem that was holding back the market: the state of Florida prohibits residents from purchasing electricity from a source other than a utility. Unlike all other sunny states in the U.S., third party solar companies such as SolarCity, SunRun and Vivint are prohibited from providing solar leases and PPAs to homeowners. This utility-biased state policy has made it difficult for homeowners to finance their rooftop solar systems.

Fortunately, affordable solar loans are now available in Florida. These low interest and easy qualification loans help homeowners get to positive cash flow (electricity savings > financing costs). As a result, the rooftop solar industry in Florida is finally growing, in spite of the utilities’ anti-competitive policies.

My guest this week is Justin Hoysradt, CEO of Vinyasun, one of the leading residential solar installers in Florida. Please join me on this week’s Energy Show on Renewable Energy World as Justin talks about the opportunities for rooftop solar in Florida, as well as some of their unique requirements — such as mounting systems and panels that can resist hurricane-force winds.

All PennWell Sites - Click to Expand
All PennWell Events - Click to Expand
© 2015. PennWell Corporation. All Rights Reserved. PRIVACY POLICY | TERMS AND CONDITIONS | SITE MAP | PennWell Websites | PennWell Events